The government’s proposal to raise the debt ceiling filled with holes

The United States has been in a never-ending financial crisis in recent years and it will take drastic measures for the government to be on its way to fixing it.

The government has suggested raising the debt ceiling in order to give the United States a little breathing room when dealing with their financial troubles.

However, it is taking a step in the wrong direction towards digging themselves out of this hole.

An NBC News poll found that 44 percent of Americans oppose raising the debt ceiling while 22 percent of Americans support raising it.

The fact that the amount of Americans who oppose raising the debt ceiling doubles the amount who support it is encouraging to hear.

However, there is still 34 percent who didn’t choose a side on this issue.

That alarming statistic shows how complicated this issue really is.

It proves that whatever course of action President Barack Obama and Congress decide to take won’t be pretty.

Despite the ugliness that is likely to follow, a side has to be taken by the U.S. government.

The national debt currently stands at 16.7 trillion dollars because of past mistakes done by the government including the Iraq War, Bush’s bailout of the banks, Obama’s stimulus package and Obamacare which will go into effect in 2014.

A significant contribution to the national debt that may soon be added is the proposed strike on Syria.

One of the last things the country can afford is more military spending when it is in the heart of the issue.

The Iraq War put a huge dent in the economy and although the cost has been disputed, it was close to a trillion if not more.

A military strike on Syria would likely cost the United States a similar rate to that of the Iraq War.

By raising the debt ceiling, the government would send a message that it plans to keep spending more money.

Instead of giving themselves more room for error than they deserve, the government should start holding themselves more accountable for their mistakes.

They have already been given plenty of room for error, and it needs to stop.

Congressmen need to avoid approving flawed ideas if the economy is ever to strive again.

This has greatly impacted bills that have negatively affected our economy including as the Small Business Jobs Act in 2010.

According to a poll conducted by Gallup, only 19 percent of the country approves of the job Congress is doing.

Although 19 percent may seem like a harsh number, this is actually five percent higher than Gallup’s poll from last month. Congress’ approval rating is also at its highest level since October 2012.

Although the number has slowly risen, Congress’ approval rating is still nothing to be proud of.

The U.S. seems to collectively agree that the government should pay the consequences for their actions.

Americans are held responsible for debt if they’re not paying their dues on their credit cards and getting out of debt.

The government should stop spending and hold it off until they decrease the debt.

If the government doesn’t default the debt, they will have no incentive to work toward decreasing it.

Their lack of responsibility will continue to be detrimental to our economy if they don’t change their spending habits.

The government needs to take a big step and start controlling their budget more wisely by not spending money they do not have.

Not raising the debt ceiling is a great way to start on this, as it will motivate the government to cut down on spending.

They haven’t made enough effort to solve this problem as the recession has hit the U.S.

Although defaulting the national debt will not save the economy in the foreseeable future, it will save the United States from a worst case scenario, which would likely involve even more debt.

Raising the ceiling will give Americans false hope about the state of the economy. The government would just be pushing the problem aside instead of tackling it head on.

Defaulting the debt could actually turn out to be a great long-term solution for the country if executed properly.

About Ian O'Brien