Seeing New Year’s resolutions through

RAE ROMERO/ Daily Titan

RAE ROMERO/ Daily Titan

 

Who still makes New Year’s resolutions? You may or may not be surprised to find out that many Cal State Fullerton students still do. Exercise and nutrition is a rampant 2013 resolution among CSUF students.

According to Examiner.com, 45 of every 100 Americans usually make New Year’s resolutions. Eight of those are successful.

Whether students at CSUF are choosing to focus on diet, working out and getting into shape or feeling better all around, these students have a variety of strategies he or she uses to accomplish these goals.

Sherry Eutsey, a freshman biology major at CSUF, has a goal to eat less junk food and exercise more. “I’m not going to cut back on all of the fast food, but try to minimize the portions,” said Eutsey. Some of Eutsey’s top goals are to lose all of her leftover pregnancy weight, get toned and flatten her stomach.

This semester Eutsey is taking a one-unit resistance training class twice a week where the instructor helps with her goal and recommends that students workout outside of class.  Eutsey has been following her instructor’s recommendations and is seeing results already.

“I can feel myself getting sore, and I haven’t felt that in a long time … now I feel more energized than I did before,” Eutsey said.

Students may feel intimidated by the perceived difficulty it takes to eat healthy and exercise. However, Adam Nguyen, a sophomore at CSUF majoring in business entrepreneurship, says once you get into the routine of good nutrition and exercise, it becomes easy to continue.

“You get addicted to how it feels not to eat those fried foods,” Nguyen says. Nguyen’s goal for the New Year is to get more lean.

Nguyen has been doing cardio to get his heart rate going. He’s been using less heavy weights and focusing on working more than one muscle at a time.

“I try to go for six days a week, just for at least 30 minutes a day,”  Nguyen said.

“No fried foods and less carbs and no soda. I feel a lot better, I feel more and more awake and less filled with junk,” Nguyen said.

Ivan Trujillo, junior electrical engineering major, eats four to five small meals a day. Trujillo says to stay away from sugar-heavy items like Coke. He eats fish, meats and Mexican food once in a while when his mom cooks for him.

Trujillo works out Monday through Friday and is being more consistent this year than in years past. He says his goals are challenging and sometimes he will cheat with a little sip of Coke, but for the most part he has followed his guidelines.

If you’re wondering how many people make New Year’s resolutions regarding fitness and nutrition and how effective they are at completing them, you should check out fitness and nutrition expert Mark MacDonald’s book Body Confidence. The book that works as a guide to good nutrition and fitness says tactics people commonly use to lose weight for the New Year are ineffective.

“We cut calories, we starve ourselves, we go on that crash course diet that drops our blood sugar, that makes us burn muscle which slows down our metabolism,” said MacDonald. He also says that people need to let go of the diet mentality, eat every three hours and eat a balance of protein, fat and carbohydrates. This will balance out the blood sugar and stabilizing hormones.

There are reasons why New Year’s resolutions are difficult for some people. According to Shape.com, some of the top reasons that people are not effective at completing their goals are because they are going at it alone and not working with people who inspire them to be better. Other reasons include making goals that are too high and unrealistic, and not believing in his or herself.

Beverly Hills psychotherapist Barbara Neitlich, featured on Shape.com, says people need to treat themselves with kindness and congratulate themselves for every little accomplishment. This way, goals can be achieved.

This New Year we can filter out old, ineffective habits to attain our resolutions and instead take advice of the experts as well as the variety of tactics used by CSUF students.

About Tiffany Johnstone