They’re your beliefs, not mine

The United States founders dreamed of a free America. They wrote in the Constitution, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

Then why is it that most of the U.S. presidential candidates thus far have felt like they needed to publicize their Christian backgrounds?

Christians and Christian-based religions have taken over the United States and have implemented laws that sometimes restrict the rights of everyone else.

There was some controversy a while back over President Barack Obama’s religion. God forbid he should really be a practicing Muslim. But why?

Why does the religion of a president or anyone else’s religion matter as long as their ethics are in order?

On his website, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney said that if elected he will “not only appoint an Attorney General who will defend the Defense of Marriage Act … but he will also champion a Federal Marriage Amendment to the Constitution defining marriage as between one man and one woman.”

Romney has been relatively vocal on his religion.

A YouTube video supporting Romney recently went viral. In the video he says, “Never before has the nation so needed a God-fearing man. The founders of this great nation were God-fearing men.”

One of our Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson, was quoted in saying, “I am for freedom of religion and against all maneuvers to bring about a legal ascendancy of one sect over another.”

The idea that marriage is between one man and one woman stems from religion and from a time when procreation was instrumental to human survival. Romney will be using his religion and belief to take away the rights of loving couples all across the United States.

Can the battle on the idea that a country and government can practice a separation between church and state get any more ridiculous?

Enter former Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum.

Santorum has been very vocal about his beliefs on banning contraception and banning what he called “sodomy.”

In an ABC News interview, Santorum said that it should be up to the state to pass those laws, laws that would in turn take away the rights of millions of people.

How did he win the Republican primary elections in states such as Iowa and Kansas?

If all states were required to vote on laws which banned contraceptives and sodomy, then it is a somber chance that it would actually pass in some states.

According to a report from the Guttmacher Institute, it is believed that about 62 percent of women aged 15-44 are currently using a method of contraception.

But that does not stop Santorum from trying to push his religious beliefs about birth control upon the sexually active population and those who use it for hormonal help.

There is no law saying that everyone has to wear a condom when they have sex.

It is not like the rest of the heathen population is interfering with the rights of conservative Christians. Gay marriage, contraception and sodomy are just a few things that make NO impact on their daily lives whatsoever.

It is a choice whether to use birth control or marry someone of the same sex. Lawmakers have no right to use their extreme beliefs as a platform to pass laws which will take away rights.

Religion is all about the person and their interaction with their God(s).

There is no place for religion in government, especially when this nation is built on the idea of religious freedom and freedom from religion.

About Sepideh Nia